Hubble Sees Turquoise-Tinted Plumes in Large Magellanic Cloud


The brightly glowing plumes seen in this image are reminiscent of an underwater scene, with turquoise-tinted currents and nebulous strands reaching out into the surroundings.

However, this is no ocean. This image actually shows part of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), a small nearby galaxy that orbits our galaxy, the Milky Way, and appears as a blurred blob in our skies. The NASA/European Space Agency (ESA) Hubble Space Telescope has peeked many times into this galaxy, releasing stunning images of the whirling clouds of gas and sparkling stars (opo9944a, heic1301, potw1408a).

This image shows part of the Tarantula Nebula’s outskirts. This famously beautiful nebula, located within the LMC, is a frequent target for Hubble (heic1206, heic1402). 

In most images of the LMC the color is completely different to that seen here. This is because, in this new image, a different set of filters was used. The customary R filter, which selects the red light, was replaced by a filter letting through the near-infrared light. In traditional images, the hydrogen gas appears pink because it shines most brightly in the red. Here however, other less prominent emission lines dominate in the blue and green filters.

This data is part of the Archival Pure Parallel Project (APPP), a project that gathered together and processed over 1,000 images taken using Hubble’s Wide Field Planetary Camera 2, obtained in parallel with other Hubble instruments. Much of the data in the project could be used to study a wide range of astronomical topics, including gravitational lensing and cosmic shear, exploring distant star-forming galaxies, supplementing observations in other wavelength ranges with optical data, and examining star populations from stellar heavyweights all the way down to solar-mass stars.

Image Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA: acknowledgement: Josh Barrington
Text: European Space Agency
via NASA http://1.usa.gov/1yUWvxS

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Hi down there Ghazi!


Hi down there Ghazi!

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#DogoArgentino #Puppy “Che”


#DogoArgentino #Puppy “Che” via Instagram http://bit.ly/1r3NvOV

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Media Invited to Participate in Interactive Space Station Technology Forum

Media Invited to Participate in Interactive Space Station Technology Forum

Media are invited to interact with NASA experts who will answer questions about technologies being demonstrated on the International Space Station (ISS) during “Destination Station: ISS Technology Forum” from 10 to 11 a.m. EDT (9 to 10 a.m. CDT) Monday, Oct. 27, at the U.S. Space & Rocket Center in Huntsville, Alabama. READ MORE >>

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NASA TV Coverage Set for U.S. Cargo Ship’s Departure from International Space Station

NASA TV Coverage Set for U.S. Cargo Ship’s Departure from International Space Station

After delivering almost 5,000 pounds of supplies and experiments to the International Space Station during a month-long stay, the SpaceX Dragon cargo spacecraft is set to leave the orbital laboratory on Saturday, Oct. 25. READ MORE >>

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Extreme Ultraviolet Image of a Significant Solar Flare


The sun emitted a significant solar flare on Oct. 19, 2014, peaking at 1:01 a.m. EDT. NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory, which is always observing the sun, captured this image of the event in extreme ultraviolet wavelength of 131 Angstroms – a wavelength that can see the intense heat of a flare and that is typically colorized in teal.

This flare is classified as an X1.1-class flare. X-class denotes the most intense flares, while the number provides more information about its strength. An X2 flare is twice as intense as an X1, and an X3 is three times as intense.

Solar flares are powerful bursts of radiation. Harmful radiation from a flare cannot pass through Earth’s atmosphere to physically affect humans on the ground, however — when intense enough — they can disturb the atmosphere in the layer where GPS and communications signals travel.

> More: NASA’s SDO Observes an X-class Solar Flare

Image Credit: NASA/Solar Dynamics Observatory
via NASA http://1.usa.gov/1DsRUCR

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#TosaInu Musashi


#TosaInu Musashi via Instagram http://bit.ly/1wYGuT3

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Pretty productive Sunday.


Pretty productive Sunday. via Instagram http://bit.ly/1wYb3sc

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Hiking Horseshoe Basin and Leavick Tarn in Fairplay, Colorado with Musashi and Che

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#Creeper


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